Moving On . . . 

Moving On . . . 

During the past three years, writing for Another Voice became a very much looked-forward-to part of my life. Even though I was sometimes late meeting deadlines, I always enjoyed the opportunity to express my views and my heart. I loved writing together with other voices and eagerly looked forward to my sister’s posts. Another Voice gave all of us a unique opportunity to write directly from within our conflicted context on the basis of a shared faith and passion for justice. Women’s voices are not frequently heard in our context; whether we are Messianic Jews or Palestinian Christians. The anonymity of our personas gave us the freedom to say things that would have been much more difficult to say openly. We wrote with honesty, sharing our pain, frustrations with the status quo and our hopes for the future. The sense of liberty I experienced was invigorating. Many of us found and honed our voices while writing for the blog. 

After three years, we have reached a point where we’ve grown; and the circumstances, choices, and events of our lives have moved each one of us in new directions. It’s time to look back and celebrate our accomplishments. We are a company of diverse, passionate women who care deeply for our peoples and have had the courage to speak out and open our hearts. We’ve shared our stories, our sorrows, joys and hopes, our laughter and tears with a small but interested world. We’ve given our readers a taste of what it’s like to live in an extended, intractable conflict. I’ve delighted in our polyphonic voices and I’m thankful for all the months of hearing our interwoven harmonies. 

Moving on seems always to have a component of ambiguity. I am no stranger to ambiguity since I generally perceive life incongruently or even paradoxically. I recently read and resonated with an article that focused on this issue. The author, Menacham Fisch, writes that he lives with “A willingness and ability to live creatively undecided between contrasting normative options, to straddle incongruous and initially ambivalating normative divides, resisting the temptation to resolve them, and attempting to somehow conjoin them into interesting if strained wholes greater than their parts. . .”  

I can whole heartedly celebrate what we’ve done and look forward with anticipation to see where each one of us will go from here. At the same time, I will miss hearing my sister’s voices in this context; but I know that they, as will I, continue to be another voice to our communities and beyond.

 

 
Until this becomes a reality

Until this becomes a reality

Hope: That thing with feathers

Hope: That thing with feathers