All tagged Passover

Celebration and Remembrance

This is a time of holidays, celebrations and remembrance. As Jews, we are a people of passion and extremes. We remember our history as a people in repeating cycles of weeks, months and years. We always seem to be remembering something from our long history. Our memorials and celebrations are often framed by death, destruction, suffering and loss. We remember that deliverance comes at a cost.

4 Activists and 4 Questions: A Passover Challenge for Social Change

As this Passover comes, the themes of oppression, liberation and redemption are at the forefront of my mind.  One of the Hebrew names for Passover is zman heyruteinu, the season of our freedom.  As I look at the political situation around me in Israel, as I travel to and from the United States, my heart is heavy.

6 Women and Moses

Having just come through the Passover season, this year I’ve been thinking much about Moses and the women in his life. The story of the exodus from Egypt has six strong women, unsung heroes, without whom the story could never have happened. These women were all courageous. Some of them actively disobeyed the laws of the time, stood against the status quo, acted bravely, and were instruments of God’s will during a time of slavery and oppression. Two of these six women were not even Jews.

Spring: A Promise of Life from Death

Spring is always a season of promise as cold winter winds cease and brown lands become green. For me, green has always held the promise of new life growing out of the still brown deadness of earth. This year is no exception; but even as winter fades and spring emerges, the seasons themselves are overlapping in unusual ways. One day temperatures soar and on the next we have cold rain. While this is not unusual, it’s of longer duration this year. Is this a metaphor of delayed rebirth or is it simply the result of massive unsettled global weather patterns?

4 Daughters and 5 Questions

In many holidays, women play a secondary or supporting role and the gender balance is largely skewed in favor of patriarchy. Yet, if you look at the Passover story, one could very easily frame the holiday within the context of women’s heroism.  Think of Yocheved (the mother of Moses), Shiphrah and Puah (the midwives who defied Pharaoh’s order to kill the male Hebrew children), Miriam (Moses’ sister who cleverly arranged for Moses’ protection, and later a prophetess to her people), Tzipporah (who saved her husband Moses when God wanted to kill him on the way back to Egypt for not circumcising his son) and Pharaoh’s daughter (named Bithiah in Jewish tradition, who drew out Moses from the Nile, named him and fostered him).

Hosting the Last Supper (Part 3)

As we enter both Easter and Passover, we asked our bloggers to give their thoughts on what it would have been like to host the Last Supper. Most people know the story but never consider who the hosts were or what it must have been like to be asked to host the momentous occasion. Here is part 3 as our bloggers present their unique perspectives on this idea:

Hosting the Last Supper (Part 2)

As we enter both Easter and Passover, we asked our bloggers to give their thoughts on what it would have been like to host the Last Supper. Most people know the story but never consider who the hosts were or what it must have been like to be asked to host the momentous occasion. Here is part 2 as our bloggers present their unique perspectives on this idea:

Hosting the Last Supper (Part 1)

As we enter both Easter and Passover, we asked our bloggers to give their thoughts on what it would have been like to host the Last Supper. Most people know the story but never consider who the hosts were or what it must have been like to be asked to host the momentous occasion. Our bloggers present their unique perspectives on this idea in two parts. Here is part 1: