All in Muslim Holidays

5 Responses to Ramadan

The Muslim fast of Ramadan is upon us, leaving many Christians and Messianic Jewish Israelis apprehensive about the month to come. How do we respond to this month? Will there be increased tensions and violence?

Yom Kippur and Eid-al- Adha: commonalities and differences

Jewish Israel has just passed through the season of the High Holidays. We’ve celebrated the New Year (Rosh Hashanah), which is not really the new year as it’s the beginning of the seventh month of the Jewish calendar, the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) and The Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot). These holidays, like the Moslem holidays, are both set according to the lunar calendar, but with differing dates. Israel’s Arab Moslem citizens have just celebrated, Eid-al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice).

7 things you should know about Ramadan in Palestine

As a Christian, I do not observe Ramadan. However, living in a country where the majority are Muslims, Ramadan becomes a part of our lives and a wonderful part of the year. Ramadan is such a fun time, as there are many events and celebrations during this month, and it’s so fun to participate in the “iftar” (breaking of the fast) with friends and colleagues.

5 Muslim Thinkers and a Messianic Jew

Most people do not fall into a static category of religion, like my friend who asked me if I think ISIS represents Islam. She did not wish to be misrepresented. Islam is not one thing, just as Judaism is not one thing, just as Christianity is not one thing.

Muslims now number over two billion people, and the number is rising. Often we associate Islamic authority and teaching with the Arab world, but most of the world’s Muslims are far from this region. Eighty percent of Muslims are non-Arab, and the most populous Muslim country is Indonesia.

How to Iftar: From a Muslim to a non-Muslim

If you’re invited to an iftar  meal during Ramadan, here is a short description of what to expect, and some suggestions for what to bring with you.  

Each evening during Ramadan Muslims break their fast with the meal known as iftar. An iftar meal is full of juices, teas, sweets, and appetizers and sometimes even main dishes. It is a celebrated occasion each evening and family and friends (Muslim and non-Muslim) are often invited.